2012 Rostrum videos

ROSTRUM: The Language and Thinking Lecture Series at Bard College, August 2012


ROGER BERKOWITZ
Associate Professor of Political Studies and Human Rights; Academic Director, Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and the Humanities, Bard College

“Freedom and Presidential Leadership”

This lecture was not recorded. Watch Professor Berkowitz speak in a simulcast of the Hannah Arendt Center September 2012 conference on Presidential leadership>>

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JONAH BOKAER
Choreographer

ANTHONY MCCALL
Media Artist

About ECLIPSE, August 21, 2012

Bokaer and McCall discuss their collaboration on a new work, ECLIPSE, which for its premiere in September 2012 had the distinction of being the first production to be staged at the new Fishman Space at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.


LEON BOTSTEIN
President of the College and Leon Levy Professor in the Arts and Humanities

Saint-Saëns: Open Rehearsal and Conductor’s Talk, August 17, 2012

President Botstein lectured to the students before leading the American Symphony Orchestra in an open rehearsal of Saint-Saëns’s Le déluge, poème biblique and Lili Boulanger’s Psalm 130, “Du fond de l’abîme

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PAUL CADDEN-ZIMANSKY
Assistant Professor of Physics

“Quantum Darwinism and the Limits of Visualizing the Physical World,” August 22, 2012

As our theories of the physical world increase in explanatory power, the concepts they employ have become more abstract. This lecture will explain how some of the most counterintuitive concepts in contemporary physics are the result not of deliberate obfuscation on the part of scientists or an over-reliance on complex mathematics, but stem from inherent prejudices that humans have about reality and the constraints we are forced to adhere to in our intellectual endeavors.


heartyrootsLOCAL FARMING

JOHN-PAUL SLIVA, Bard Farm
DERRICK MEAD, Mead Orchards
KEN KLEINPETER, Glynwood Farms
BEN SHUTE, Hearty Roots Farm

“Local Food Matters,” August 24, 2012

A discussion among farmers about farming in the contemporary world, specifically in the Hudson Valley, and with a special emphasis on sustainability.


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KRIS FEDER
Associate Professor of Economics

“Economists on History (and the History of Economics),” August 24, 2012

A common theme among these selections is that of rapid technical change. George (1879) reflects on the unprecedented rate of invention of the past century and asks why the countless labor-saving devices have not eradicated poverty. The average standard of living had risen, but the gap between rich and poor had so widened that the poor were now worse off than before, and the country was mired in depression.

A half century later, Keynes, writing after the onset of the Great Depression, ascribes it to growing pains–to the inability of institutions to adapt quickly enough to rapid technical change. A century hence, he predicts, humanity (at least in “progressive” countries, will have solved “the economic problem”–the struggle for subsistence that has up to now been the lot of all living things.

Hayek (1944) observes that rapid technological (and other) change brings the risk of loss for people who are free to choose their occupations. Spooked by the rise of socialism and Nazism, he warns that efforts to use government to protect individuals from such risks (to guarantee income stability) puts us on the “road to serfdom.”

What accounts for the rapidity of economic growth of recent centuries, after millennia of relative constancy? Keynes’ 100 years have nearly passed (2030). Has humankind just about solved “the economic problem”? Is the Golden Age upon us at last? If not, why not? And what are the prospects for the next 100 years?


Daniel KarpowitzDANIEL KARPOWITZ
Director of Policy and Academics for the Bard Prison Initiative; Lecturer in Law and the Humanities

“The Paradox of Punishment,” August 20, 2012



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FELICIA KEESING
Associate Professor of Biology

“Climate Change, Insight, and Your Inner Fish: Freedom and Constraint in Science”

Professor Keesing’s 2012 lecture was not recorded. Watch her 2011 lecture, “Chocolate Makes You Fit and Preschool Keeps You Out of Jail: Why You Should Care About the Nature of Science”:


TanyaTANYA MARCUSE
Photographer, Visiting Associate Professor of First-Year Seminar

“Undergarments and Armor,” August 14, 2012

Photographer Tanya Marcuse won a Guggenheim Fellowship to pursue her project Undergarments and Armor– she photographed corsets, helmets, cage crinolines and breastplates in archives in the U.S. and England. In this video Tanya discusses how she explores the theme of freedom and constraint in Undergarments and Armor and in her more recent projects as well.


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ANTHONY MCCALL
Media Artist

JONAH BOKAER
Choreographer

About ECLIPSE, August 21, 2012

Bokaer and McCall discuss their collaboration on a new work, ECLIPSE, which for its premiere in September, 2012 had the distinction of being the first production to be staged at the new Fishman Space at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

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FRED MOTEN
Helen L. Bevington Professor of Modern Poetry, Duke University

“The Touring Machine: Flesh Thought Inside Out,” August 23, 2012

“The Touring Machine” explores some issues that emerge at the convergence of cognitive science (selfhood), political theory (sovereignty) and black poetics (slavery).


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moynahanGREG MOYNAHAN
Associate Professor of History

“History and Thomas Kuhn’s “Decisive Transformation of the Image of Science,” August 16, 2012

This talk investigates Thomas Kuhn’s short presentation “The Essential Tension” by placing it in the context of his classic book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, and situating both in the broader modern history of science.


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CATE SHANAHAN, M.D.
Nutritionist; Author of Deep Nutrition and Food Rules

“The Omega Generation: How Modern Foods Have Redefined What It Means to be Human,” August 20, 2012

Kids today rely on prescriptions and specialized care more than any generation in history. They’re suffering from diseases that used to be limited to adults, like diabetes and hypertension, and from novel disorders that have just recently emerged. This lecture explores how children’s bodies are adapting—or failing to adapt—to a diet far less rich than their parents have enjoyed growing up, and will demonstrate a pattern of facial and skeletal anatomic changes between their great-grandparents generation and their own. Attendees will learn how rebuilding a healthy relationship with food will help their own bodies work better and may be critical for long-term survival of the human race as currently defined.