2015 Rostrum Events

ROSTRUM:
THE LANGUAGE AND THINKING
EVENT SERIES
AT BARD COLLEGE, AUGUST 2015


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Race in the Everyday
A PANEL DISCUSSION WITH LOCAL COMMUNITY LEADERS

“Race in the Everyday: Activism, Social Justice, and Political Organizing”

How do we understand race in contemporary America, not only in light of the violence that has (finally) caught national headlines, but in terms of our own communities? What can ‘change-making’ or political action look like in our own neighborhood and local institutions? And how do we understand our own participation in relation to larger movements that are focused on racially-motivated violence, police brutality, and widespread social injustice? This panel of community leaders and experts from the region will address these questions with an emphasis on practical activity and student involvement.

Participants:

Angela Armstrong is an assistant principal at Kingston High School. She received her undergraduate degree in education with a concentration in special education from Michigan State University. She holds a Masters in Human Resource Development from American International College and a license in Administration from Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts. She is certified as a School District Administrator. She was an adjunct professor at SUNY New Paltz for 5 years in the Department of Black Studies. This September she will begin her 32nd year in education. She is the single mother of one son, Jurrel.
Micah Blumenthal, born of an African American mother and Jewish father in 1975 and raised in Mt. Vernon, NY, has called Kingston home for the past 6 years of his 40 years on this planet. In this time he has grounded himself in the community both personally and professionally as being co-owner of CIXdesigns, a web and graphic design company that works primarily with local businesses and organizations, as well as being a yoga teacher at Mudita Yoga Center, a board member of CCE (Center for Creative Education) working with youth and drumming in P.O.O.K. (Percussion Orchestra of Kingston), a helping hand at the Uptown Farmers Market for Freebird Farms (come say “Hi!” on Saturdays), Rocket Scientist for the O+ Festival, and organizer of Day 1 – an annual New Years Day walk celebrating what unites us, as a response to the current discord – he is dedicated to creating positive change in his community. Most of all though, he is a happy father of two. This all plays a part in his political views and social activism.
Alexandra Cox is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at SUNY New Paltz, where she runs the department’s concentration in criminology. She received her Ph.D. in Criminology from the University of Cambridge. Her research is about the governance of youth crime, racism and mass incarceration, and rural imprisonment. She is currently writing a book, to be published by Rutgers University Press, about a group of young people making their way through New York’s criminal justice system. Prior to receiving her Ph.D., she worked at the Neighborhood Defender Service of Harlem as a sentencing mitigation specialist and at the Drug Policy Alliance’s Office of Legal Affairs. She is a former Gates Cambridge scholar and a Soros Justice Advocacy fellow. She also serves on the board of Literacy for Incarcerated Teens (which builds libraries and supports author visits in juvenile facilities), Drama Club (which conducts theater workshops inside of juvenile facilities) and is a member of the Prison Voices Project media collective.
Cedric Fulton is the Deputy Director of the Staley B. Keith Social Justice Center, a grassroots, non-profit organization leading a movement for racial justice in Hudson, NY. Cedrick is a lifelong resident of Hudson, dedicated to empowering young black men and women to resist the marginalization of their communities. He is also an organizer, educator, writer, speaker and a devoted father of two. Formerly incarcerated, his work comes from his own lived experiences of systemic injustice with an intimate understanding of the institutions most impacting peoples’ lives. He holds an A.A.S. from Bronx Community College, and a degree in Political Science from Framingham State. In addition to his work with the Staley B. Keith Social Justice Center, Cedrick has worked with ReEntry Columbia, Kite’s Nest, the Greater Hudson Promise Neighborhood, and a wide range of individuals and organizations working together to create long-term, transformative change..
Nina Dawson, was born and raised in Kingston, NY. She attended the University at Albany and SUNY New Paltz where she studied political science. She has worked extensively in the field of healthcare and is presently the Credentials Coordinator for HealthAlliance Hospitals. She serves locally on the boards of Community Development, Human Rights, and Kingston Recreation and is currently running for Alderwoman in Kingston’s 4th Ward.

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Music, Identity, and Politics in Latin America
A PANEL DISCUSSION WITH COMPOSERS AND MUSICOLOGISTS

“Music, Identity, and Politics in Latin America”

In the spirit of the 26th annual Bard Music Festival, this panel will deal with the artistic and political expression of the nationalistic movements of 20th century Mexico. After the revolution of 1910, Mexico found itself with an identity crisis: the feudal system inherited from the Spanish after the independence (1810), and its ruling class of European heritage, had been destroyed, necessitating a search for a new cultural identity. Figures such as Carlos Chávez, José Vasconcelos (then minister of education and philosopher) and Diego Rivera began to promote a new national identity based on the nation’s indigenous past. Vasconcelos put forth his ideas of the raza cósmica (cosmic race), embracing the idea of transcending traditional concepts of race in favor of a universal race resulting from a mixing of all people; in practice it was an embrace of mestizaje, the mixing of european and indigenous blood that most Mexicans were the product of. At the same time, a young Chávez composed imagined Aztec music, distancing himself from the European roots of the orchestral world in search of a new musical identity, indeed, writing to his friend, American composer Aaron Copland about the need to create original American music (American in the sense of the continent of the Americas). These and many other figures pushed to create a modern Mexico with a self-created identity, in the processes spurring a variety of political shifts and changes. This panel is an exploration of the roots of modern Mexico through the work of such figures.

Participants:
Andrés Martínez de Velasco was born in Mexico City in 1991 and began studying music with piano lessons when he was 6. He first formally studied composition at the McGill Conservatory in Montreal after completing high school in Mexico City. After a year in Montreal, he enrolled at the Bard College Conservatory of Music’s dual-degree program, where he majored in composition and physics, graduating in May 2015. At Bard he studied composition with Joan Tower, George Tsontakis and John Halle. Andrés has written music for the Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival, the Deer Valley Music Festival, NYU´s Dynamic Music Festival, Bard´s Graduate Vocal Arts Program, the Bard College Conservatory Orchestra and Contemporaneous.His newest composition, Espacios y Distancias, will be premiered this August by Contemporaneous as part of the Bard Music Festival, Carlos Chávez & His World.
Walter Aaron Clark received his doctorate in musicology from UCLA (1992), where he wrote his dissertation under the guidance of the late Robert M. Stevenson. He also holds performance degrees in classical guitar from the North Carolina School of the Arts (B.M.), where he studied with Jesús Silva and performed in a master class with Andrés Segovia; and the University of California, San Diego (M.A.), where he was a student of Pepe and Celin Romero. Clark studied early music with lutenist Jürgen Hübscher and concertized in Germany for two years on a Fulbright grant (1984-86). Before coming to UCR, he was on the faculty at the University of Kansas for ten years, having previously taught various courses at Scripps and Pomona Colleges, California State University, Long Beach, and UCLA. Prof. Clark’s specialty is the music of Spain and Latin America, and he is the founder/director of the Center for Iberian and Latin American Music at the University of California, Riverside.
Dr. Jean Carlos Cowan, Professor, has been teaching at Orange County Community College since the year 2000. He was first a member of the English Department but in 2007 moved to the Global Studies Department. He has always considered teaching his true calling and vocation as well as a social commitment to the students and to the community. He considers a student-center approach the most productive and valuable. He teaches all levels of Spanish language and Literature, Latin American History and Migration. Dr. Cowan was awarded a dual PhD from the SUNY Albany in Spanish Literature and Latin American History and Politics from LACS (Latino American and Caribbean Studies Department) in 2006. His dissertation “Internal Displacement to the City of Medellin a Global and Transnational Approach” was an original research project that has recently been considered for publication by the Center of Immigration Studies at the University of California. In addition, he has done other research work: “The refugee crisis of Colombians in Ecuador and Panama” also research about Latino Migration to the United States and Brazilian Migration. He also writes political and romantic poetry in Spanish and Portuguese.

Joan Retallack
Joan Retallack
JOAN RETALLACK

“Who is Gertrude Stein and What is She Saying?”

A talk by Joan Retallack with assistance from Dr. Seuss and a cameo appearance by Hannah Arendt.

Joan Retallack, John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Professor Emerita of Humanities, directed the Language & Thinking Program for 10 years. She is a poet and essayist who has written extensively on Gertrude Stein.

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Contemporaneous
CONTEMPORANEOUS

“New Music and Storytelling”

Contemporaneous will perform excerpts from the score to an in-progress film, written by Contemporaneous co-artistic director Dylan Mattingly. The process of creating musical worlds for film will be laid bare in discussion with the composer and musicians. Students will gain insight into the decisions that inform the crucial but invisible force responsible for the emotional structure of a movie — the score. Questions about the manipulation of an audience through storytelling might arise. When is fiction a story and when is it a lie? How can music affect the “suspension of disbelief”? In comparison with Mattingly’s music for film, Contemporaneous will also hold an open rehearsal for a work of Mattingly’s concert music, A Way A Lone A Last A Loved A Long the Riverrun. The question of how the storytelling process within this music differs from that of the music for film will be discussed.

Contemporaneous is an ensemble of 21 musicians that includes many recent Bard graduates and whose mission is to bring to life the music of now.
Dylan Mattingly, a native of Berkeley, California, holds a B.A. in Classical Greek and a B.M. in Music Composition from Bard College where he studied with George Tsontakis, Kyle Gann, John Halle, and Joan Tower. Mentored as well in Berkeley by composer John Adams, his music has been performed in San Francisco, Sydney, Berlin, New York, London, and many other cities around the world. He currently attends the Yale School of Music, where he studies with David Lang.
David Bloom is founding co-artistic director of Contemporaneous, a New York-based ensemble of 21 musicians dedicated to performing the most exciting music of the present moment, and recently lauded in New York Times for a “ferocious, focused performance.” A devoted advocate for new music, he regularly works with living composers to bring new and recent works to life.
David has conducted over 120 world premieres at such venues as Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, (le) poisson rouge, Merkin Concert Hall, and the Bang on a Can Marathon. He is a frequent guest conductor for NOW Ensemble, Hotel Elefant, JACK Quartet, Mantra Percussion, and TILT Brass, among others. He has worked with such composers as Donnacha Dennehy, Michael Harrison, Gabrielle Herbst, Yotam Haber, Dylan Mattingly, Andrew Norman, and Aaron Seigel and regularly works outside of the classical realm with such artists as Jherek Bischoff, David Byrne, and Courtney Love.
Especially active as a conductor of new opera throughout the US and Canada, David currently serves as music director on three traveling productions of works by Judd Greenstein, Anthony Gatto, and Todd Almond. He has recorded for the Innova, New Amsterdam, Mexican Summer, Mona, and Starkland labels. Also a passionate teaching artist, David is a conductor for Face the Music and Special Music School, and along with Contemporaneous, he is in residence at his alma mater, Bard College.

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Madeleine George
MADELEINE GEORGE

“Big Feelings about Big Problems: Adapting Greek Tragedy for the Contemporary Stage”

For theatergoers, contemporary productions of the Greeks often feel mannered, abstract, or didactic–remote from the kind of psychological storytelling they’re used to seeing. But what does capital-T Tragedy have to offer today’s audiences that the sentimental naturalism of most American plays can’t supply? What can a Euripidean take on gods and humans illuminate about our current moment, in which the individual finds herself increasingly at the mercy of forces so vast–big data, government surveillance, movements of capital, climate crisis–that they bewilder the human mind? We’ll explore a new play in progress, an adaptation of the Bacchae set in suburban New Jersey with a lesbian separatist landscape gardener as Dionysus, with an eye to what’s most alive and relevant in the dramaturgy of the Greek source material.

Madeleine George’s plays include The (curious case of the) Watson Intelligence (Pulitzer Prize finalist; Outer Critics Circle John Gassner Award), Seven Homeless Mammoths Wander New England (Susan Smith Blackburn finalist), Precious Little, and The Zero Hour (Jane Chambers Award, Lambda Literary Award finalist). They’ve made their way to the stage through workshops at Berkeley Rep, Soho Rep, New York Theatre Workshop, Manhattan Theatre Club, and the O’Neill Playwrights Conference, and have been produced by Playwrights Horizons, Clubbed Thumb, Shotgun Players in Berkeley, City Theatre in Pittsburgh, Theater Wit in Chicago, Perseverance Theatre in Alaska, and Two River Theater Company in New Jersey, among many other places. Madeleine is a resident playwright at New Dramatists and was a founding member of the Obie-Award-winning playwrights’ collective 13P (Thirteen Playwrights, Inc.). She was on the faculty of L&T in the early 2000s, and for seven years served as director of the Bard College satellite campus at Bayview Correctional Facility in Manhattan.

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Carlos Chávez
THE AMERICAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, conducted by LEON BOTSTEIN
President of Bard College and Leon Levy Professor in the Arts and Humanities

“Reimagined Landscapes and Pasts”

The American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, President of Bard College and Leon Levy Professor in the Arts and Humanities presents a dress rehearsal of the following pieces:

Silvestre Revueltas, Cuauhnáhuac
José Pablo Moncayo, Three Pieces for Orchestra
Carlos Chávez, Sinfonía india

This plenary lecture and performance will be attended by all Language and Thinking students in Sosnoff Auditorium, Fisher Center for the Performing Arts.

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Contemporaneous
CONTEMPORANEOUS

Music of The Bakkhai

Contemporaneous will present composer Dylan Mattingly’s The Bakkhai, a work that sets the seven choruses of Euripides’ terrifying and ecstatic play in Ancient Greek. The piece uses Mattingly’s (who holds a B.A. in Classics from Bard College ’14) in-depth study of Ancient Greek choral meter as well as the Greek systems of tuning to create a kind of imaginary folk music. Euripides, who wrote the Bakkhai just before he died in 404 B.C., was an innovator in an already deeply adventurous musical environment, at the end of the Athenian empire’s great period of wealth and colonial exploits. Greek tragedy, with the texts of which most students will be familiar, will be explored through its musical elements, and we will be forced to question the validity of our surviving understanding of this crucial period of “literature” — what would an opera be without the music? — and whether or not it matters. Additionally, we will examine the history of “tuning,” a process that now seems trivial, but which represented to the Ancient Athenian a quasi-religious alignment with the laws of nature. Students will examine the relativity of what we think of as “in-tune” and be exposed to “just intonation” — music that, as was the case for all of human history until the last few hundred years, is based on the simple natural relationships found in the natural world.

Contemporaneous is an ensemble of 21 musicians that includes many recent Bard graduates and whose mission is to bring to life the music of now.
Dylan Mattingly, a native of Berkeley, California, holds a B.A. in Classical Greek and a B.M. in Music Composition from Bard College where he studied with George Tsontakis, Kyle Gann, John Halle, and Joan Tower. Mentored as well in Berkeley by composer John Adams, his music has been performed in San Francisco, Sydney, Berlin, New York, London, and many other cities around the world. He currently attends the Yale School of Music, where he studies with David Lang.
David Bloom is founding co-artistic director of Contemporaneous, a New York-based ensemble of 21 musicians dedicated to performing the most exciting music of the present moment, and recently lauded in New York Times for a “ferocious, focused performance.” A devoted advocate for new music, he regularly works with living composers to bring new and recent works to life.
David has conducted over 120 world premieres at such venues as Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, (le) poisson rouge, Merkin Concert Hall, and the Bang on a Can Marathon. He is a frequent guest conductor for NOW Ensemble, Hotel Elefant, JACK Quartet, Mantra Percussion, and TILT Brass, among others. He has worked with such composers as Donnacha Dennehy, Michael Harrison, Gabrielle Herbst, Yotam Haber, Dylan Mattingly, Andrew Norman, and Aaron Seigel and regularly works outside of the classical realm with such artists as Jherek Bischoff, David Byrne, and Courtney Love.
Especially active as a conductor of new opera throughout the US and Canada, David currently serves as music director on three traveling productions of works by Judd Greenstein, Anthony Gatto, and Todd Almond. He has recorded for the Innova, New Amsterdam, Mexican Summer, Mona, and Starkland labels. Also a passionate teaching artist, David is a conductor for Face the Music and Special Music School, and along with Contemporaneous, he is in residence at his alma mater, Bard College.

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Roger Berkowitz
ROGER BERKOWITZ

“Why Privacy Matters: What Do We Lose When We Lose Our Privacy?”

We live at a time when calls for privacy protections seem both quaint and nostalgic. Paeans to privacy do not conceal the fact that privacy daily and even hourly is being sacrificed. Newspapers cover the personal lives of movie stars and business people. Politicians are granted zero privacy. Neither are those on welfare. And everyday individuals are subject to a literally incomprehensible surveillance of their movement on city streets and over the internet. Scott McNealy of Sun Microsystems speaks for many when he says: “You have zero privacy anyway. Get over it.” But should the factual loss of privacy lead to the view that if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear? Is it not true that everyone has something to hide? How does the factual loss of our privacy change the experience of the human condition? If surveillance can penetrate both the activity of the street and the desires of our subconscious, where and how will we explore those sometimes heroic and sometimes illicit fantasies and dreams that give sense to human life? Does the demand to sacrifice privacy to make life secure, lawful, and convenient endanger our humanity?

Roger Berkowitz, Academic Director of the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College, will speak about the conflict between democratic transparency and the human need for a secret life. Assuming that privacy can harbor criminals, perverts, racists, and abusers, he will ask: Is there nevertheless a value of privacy worth defending?

Roger Berkowitz, Academic Director, Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College; Associate Professor of Politics, Philosophy, and Human Rights. He is the Author of The Gift of Science: Leibniz and the Modern Legal Tradition, an account of how the rise of science has led to the divorce of law and justice (Harvard, 2005), and the editor of Revenge and Justice, a special issue of Law, Culture, and the Humanities (2005). His interests include Heidegger, Nietzsche, Justice and Aesthetics.

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Hal Haggard
HAL HAGGARD

Beauty, Imagination, and the Secret Pleasure of Black Holes

Black holes are regions in space and measures of time from which nothing can escape. They are radiant and dynamical and even have a temperature; they are wholly unexpected creatures. They do not inexorably suck up everything as they are sometimes caricatured as doing. They can be tiny, and they can be huge, but they are so far away that we are only beginning to glimpse them now. They lock a certain kind of infinity away in their hearts that we desperately want to grasp.

What happens inside a black hole? Can they teach us a new understanding of space and time? Are they immortal? In this talk I will explore the themes of beauty, imagination and pleasure through the story of black holes and share a secret that has surprised me.

Dr. Hal Haggard is a theoretical physicist at Bard college who studies the conceptual and practical questions that surround building a quantum theory of gravity. He is interested in how black holes evolve in time and has suggested that Hawking radiation is not the whole story. He has explored the possibility that space is fundamentally discrete and made of indivisible grains of space and has pioneered the study of quantum chaos in quantum gravity. Haggard was a co-founder of the award winning Compass Project, dedicated to improving undergraduate physics education and increasing the retention of underrepresented students in the physical sciences. He was a National Science Foundation International Research Fellow in Marseille, France and is currently enjoying working on an International Space Sciences Institute grant mapping exoplanets with a team of astronomers.

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Susan Aberth
SUSAN ABERTH

“Nationalism, Murals and the Arts in Post-Revolution Mexico”

Beginning in the 1920s after the Revolution (1910-1920) many artists in Mexico were engaged in creating works of art that promoted a new sense of national pride, one that was more inclusive of the different populations and traditions existing within the country. Muralists such as José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros painted highly public works that addressed many relevant topics at the time, such as Mexico’s Pre-Columbian heritage, the Spanish Conquest and colonial domination, as well as the struggles of the revolution. Another important subject was the cultural diversity of Mexico’s indigenous peoples and in this arena other artists, such as Frida Kahlo, who celebrated and promoted their vibrant craft traditions, assisted the muralists.

Susan Aberth is an associate professor of art history, specializing in Latin American surrealism, and has been on the faculty at Bard since 2000. Dr. Aberth teaches in the Latin American and Iberian Studies Program, as well as in Africana Studies, Art History, and Gender and Sexuality Studies. She received her B.A. from the University of California, Los Angeles, her M.A. from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, and a Ph.D. from The Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She is a recipient of the professional development fellowship from the College Art Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the author of Leonora Carrington: Surrealism, Alchemy, and Art (2004).

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image from The Drone Primer
CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF THE DRONE

Robots That Can Kill

The drones of today have often been described as the “Model-T Fords” of robots. In the coming years, drones will become more autonomous: they will be able think, learn, and even kill on their own. Following a basic description of unmanned technology as it stands today, the lecture will introduce students to Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (also known as “killer robots”). We will consider autonomy in machines in the context of three readings from the anthology, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, On the Genealogy of Morality, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in order to better understand the implications of these machines for our notions of, progress, morality, and human rights. Students will participate in an in-depth discussion on the critical questions, contradictions, frictions, and forces that are that our shaping this technology and society’s response to it.

Dan Gettinger is a founder and the co-director of the Center for the Study of the Drone at Bard College. He has written extensively on unmanned systems technology, military strategy, and foreign affairs. Dan graduated in 2013 from Bard College, where he studied politics.

Arthur Holland Michel is the co-director of the Center for the Study of the Drone. He has written about drones, robotics, and defense for Wired, Al Jazeera America, Vice, Fast Company, US News, The Verge, Mashable, and Bookforum, among others. He graduated from Bard in 2013 with a degree in history.

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image from The Drone Primer
CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF THE DRONE

“Seeing From Above–A Live Aerial Demo”

Humans were never meant to fly. In spite of this fact–or perhaps because of it–the world as seen from the air is deeply fascinating and alluring. What does it mean to see from above, and how does the aerial perspective change the way we understand our world? In a live demo, students will experience the Bard campus as seen from above in real-time, through the lens of a drone. Using an First Person View system, which connects the camera on the drone to a screen on the ground, via a live transmission, students will be able to see themselves and their surroundings from a wholly unfamiliar perspective. This will be an opportunity to consider questions around selfhood, perspective, vision, and the power of the aerial view. The demo will be accompanied by a short group discussion about these issues in which students will be invited to draw connections between the experiences of seeing from above and without oneself to readings from the anthology.

Dan Gettinger is a founder and the co-director of the Center for the Study of the Drone at Bard College. He has written extensively on unmanned systems technology, military strategy, and foreign affairs. Dan graduated in 2013 from Bard College, where he studied politics.

Arthur Holland Michel is the co-director of the Center for the Study of the Drone. He has written about drones, robotics, and defense for Wired, Al Jazeera America, Vice, Fast Company, US News, The Verge, Mashable, and Bookforum, among others. He graduated from Bard in 2013 with a degree in history.

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Sven Anderson

Keith OHara
Keith O’Hara
SVEN ANDERSON and KEITH O’HARA

“What Does it Mean for a Machine to Learn?”

Computer programs that improve with experience — programs that don’t need to be programmed — have been a holy grail of artificial intelligence since the field’s founding. Recently presented in the press as some sort of revolution in algorithmic alchemy, Big Data and Deep Networks spin data into knowledge; however, these recent innovations descend from a rich family tree of research in computer science and statistics. We will provide an overview of the field of machine learning and some of its successes: computers that learn to play Backgammon and Super Mario Brothers, identify faces from pictures, recommend Netflix titles, and perform helicopter acrobatics.

Sven Anderson has taught at Bard since 2002. He is the Associate Professor of Computer Science; Director, Mind, Brain, and Behavior. He received his B.A. from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville and his M.A. & Ph. D. from Indiana University, Bloomington. His research and teaching interests include computational neuroscience, speech recognition, and natural language simplification.

Keith O’Hara has directed the draB lab (distributed robotics @ bard)
since 2009. Research in the draB lab is at the boundary between the real, physical world and the computational world; the works lives at the intersection of intelligent systems, robotics, and interactive software systems research. He has published articles in the IEEE Transactions on Robotics, Pervasive Computing, ICRA, SIGCSE, and Journal of Computing in Small Colleges. Hailing from South Jersey, Prof. O’Hara earned a B.S. from Rowan University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech where he was an Intel Foundation Fellow and a Presidential Fellow.

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Annie Seaton
ANNIE SEATON

“An Experiential Seminar on Race and the Pastoral”

Together with Annie Seaton, the Director of Bard’s Difference and Media Project and a conceptual artist with the Yam Collective, a selected group of students will participate in a three part seminar/event.

Students will read Chapter 1 of Reamer Kline’s Education for the Common Good: A History of Bard College the First 100 Years, as well as extracts from Schuler’s “Landscape as a Means of Culture,” Craig Wilder’s Ebony and Ivy, and The Anti-Rent Era in New York Law and Politics, 1839-1865 by Charles McCurdy before the seminar. The second part of the event will consist of classroom discussion and analysis. The next part of the seminar-event will take place at Blithewood, time and weather permitting.

Annie Seaton, Director of Media and Difference / Director of Multicultural Affairs; Visiting Assistant Professor of Humanities, Bard College. She was a Visiting scholar at Columbia University (2006), a Faculty Publishing Fellow, at the City University of New York (2008), and a Du Bois Fellow at Harvard (2001). She has lectured at Harvard, Brown University, New York University, SUNY Binghamton, and Amherst College.

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Hunter Lovins
HUNTER LOVINS

“Economy at the Edge”

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete” – R. Buckminster Fuller

Neo-liberalism, the ideology that is impoverishing the planet, has brought humanity to the edge of a cliff. Our economy, our environment, our society crumble beneath our feet, as money flows ever faster to a wealthy few. Eighty people now have more money than the 3.5 billion poorest people on earth. Young people graduating fear there will be no jobs for them.
The economic model that now runs the world is widely believed to be the only option. We forget that it was invented by 36 men in 1947. Encouraging blind materialism at the cost of social cohesion, it delivers economic inequality and structural unemployment, demands ever-higher levels of labor productivity while ignoring our collective failure to meet basic human needs or deliver happiness. The world needs a new economic narrative.

Hunter Lovins, faculty, Bard MBA in Sustainability, President and Founder of Natural Capitalism. Three years ago, the King of Bhutan asked Hunter Lovins to create a new global model, one that, in Buckminster Fuller’s words would work for 100% of humanity. Using Regenerative Economics, Hunter has convened leading economic thinkers, change agents, business people and academics from around the globe to create a new narrative. Hunter will describe the challenges facing us, and her work with such companies as Unilever and DNV-GL, academic institutions from Bard MBA to The De Tao Academy in China, and colleague organizations including the Club of Rome to build a new story of an economy in service to life.