Amy Loewenhaar-Blauweiss

Amy Loewenhaar-Blauweiss (B.A., New School for Social Research; M.A., Graduate Faculty, New School for Social Research; Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Training and Research Institute for Self-Psychology; Psy.D. (critical theory/psychology), Wright Institute/Professional School of Psychology, 2012) works on the role of high culture in Jewish assimilation and the pairing of high culture and barbarism in the Holocaust. She is founding director of the Terezin Publishing Project and editor of the forthcoming English-Language edition of H. G. Adler’s “Theresienstadt 1941-1945: The Face of a Coerced Community” (Cambridge University Press, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Terezin Publishing Project, 2014). The Terezin Publishing project has also brought out a reprint of “The Terezin Requiem,” “Psychological Life in Terezin,” “Composers in Theresienstadt” and other newly-translated works on Jewish life in Central Europe. Her articles have appeared in such publications as The Journal of the International Political Science Association, International Journal of Political Psychology and Political Socialization, The New York Times and The Prague Post. She is currently writing articles for TIKKUN and Jewish Currents. She has written extensively on the Jewish encounter with modernity and is author of the forthcoming “Songs in the Wilderness: Music in the Holocaust and the Betrayal of ‘Bildung.'” She sits on the Board of Directors of Partners for Progressive Israel (MeretzUSA). Her many interdisciplinary affiliations include the International Society for Political Psychology and the International Psychohistorical Association, and she has given presentations on the Jewish encounter with modernity at conferences, schools, religious centers and JCCs in the United States and abroad (Poland, Austria, Holland, Czech Republic). She is the recipient of grants from the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture and Internaciones. This past spring, under the auspices of the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and the Humanities at Bard College (with a grant from the Bertha Effron Fund), she curated the inaugural concert/lecture series, “Music in the Holocaust, Jewish Identity and Cosmopolitanism.”